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Monday, December 15, 2003

Smooth transition of institutional framework

Director of Research (Ag) Lennox Forte has disclosed that the Bank of Guyana is pleased with the smooth transition that resulted from the merger of the National Bank of Industry and Commerce (NBIC) and the Guyana National Cooperative Bank (GNCB) during the first quarter of the year.
In 2003, NBIC successfully acquired GNCB and the adjustment was done without disruption to the financial sector.
readmore...

Monetary authorities have control the money supply for 2003

For 2003, Government was able to maintain monetary and fiscal discipline in the face of external shocks and this is evident through contraction of the money supply. The end result is that Guyana was able to uphold a relatively low inflation rate.
Director of the Research Department (Ag), Bank of Guyana Lennox Forte has disclosed that despite external pressures on the monetary system, the bank was able to control the growth of liquidity for this year. The BOG is the monetary regulatory agency of public funds.
readmore...

Housing in Guyana
- progress continues

Housing is one of the basic necessities of life and Government, through the Ministry of Housing and Water, has over the last decade spared no effort in assisting Guyanese to acquire their own homes.
Government, through the Ministry of Housing, put mechanisms in place for the advancement in the housing sector, and to date, the Ministry has distributed over 55,000 house lots across Guyana in both the middle and low-income groups.
readmore...

"I am never satisfied with any level of crime’
– President urges Opposition support for tougher legislation

“Crime is always a problem for me because ideally I would like to see us a s a crime-free society. No President can be satisfied with any crime but then there is a reality too a reality that we have to face that no country is crime-free. We had seen a lull I had spoken on several occasions about the need not to be complacent.”
This is according to President Bharrat Jagdeo, while commenting on the crime situation in Guyana at his media briefing last Friday.
readmore...

Guyana continues to receive international support in the agriculture sector

During this year Guyana continued to receive technical assistance from international agencies, which have aided in the continued progress of the agriculture sector.
In January 2003, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between the National Agricultural Research Institute (NARI) and the Indian Council for Agricultural Research (ICAR) for collaboration research in agriculture to promote the agriculture sector. The MoU catered for collaboration in the crop and dairy sectors while technical assistance is targeted for 2004.
readmore...

Sophia residents comment on a Police Station in their community

Over the last year, calls for the establishment of a Police Outpost at Sophia had intensified, because of an increase in criminal activity in the area. Last week, Minister of Home Affairs, Ronald Gajraj had announced that Sophia has long outgrown a requirement for a Police Outpost, stating that a Police station would be more effective for the Police to carry out their mandate of service and protection in the area.
readmore...

Deadline for Calypso submissions set for early January

The motion is set for Mash 2004 as the Mash Management Committee gets in to gear for the 2004 Mash celebrations.
Early next year Calypsonians will be required to submit their musical scores for the 2004 Calypso Competition.
readmore...

Christmas cheer for the underprivileged

The Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security is in the process of finalizing plans for a Christmas party for street children next week.
There are a number of children who would not afforded the joys of Christmas with family and friends, as most of their peers would. The Ministry is hoping to fill this void.
readmore...

The education sector critical to gender mainstreaming

The National Commission on Women and the Women's Affairs Bureau are pioneers of the policy of gender equity in Guyana.
Approximately two months ago the Caricom Secretariat through, Andaiye, produced a document which relates to gender mainstreaming in Guyana and the critical areas through which it will have to be implemented.
readmore...

Training and security play a vital role in the Prisons environment

Training, staffing capacity, recruitment and security measures were some aspects that were highlighted today at the Disciplined Forces Commission (DFC) hearing.
Director of Prisons Dale Erskine made his presentation to Chairman of the Commission Ian Chang, Brigadier (ret) David Granger and Anil Nandallal.
readmore...


Smooth transition of institutional framework

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

Director of Research (Ag) Lennox Forte has disclosed that the Bank of Guyana is pleased with the smooth transition that resulted from the merger of the National Bank of Industry and Commerce (NBIC) and the Guyana National Cooperative Bank (GNCB) during the first quarter of the year.
In 2003, NBIC successfully acquired GNCB and the adjustment was done without disruption to the financial sector.
Instead, the consolidation resulted in a larger number of depositors having additional access to modern faculties, such as transactions at point-of-sale through the Automatic Teller Machines (ATM).
As one of the largest of the six commercial banks in the sector, the merger, if not done smoothly, could have caused significant financial imbalances to the entire banking system.
TOP

Monetary authorities have control the money supply for 2003

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

For 2003, Government was able to maintain monetary and fiscal discipline in the face of external shocks and this is evident through contraction of the money supply. The end result is that Guyana was able to uphold a relatively low inflation rate.
Director of the Research Department (Ag), Bank of Guyana Lennox Forte has disclosed that despite external pressures on the monetary system, the bank was able to control the growth of liquidity for this year. The BOG is the monetary regulatory agency of public funds.
For this year, the global economy suffered significantly with higher prices for oil, weakening currency rates and market decreasing interest rates.
Mr. Forte noted that Guyana’s banking system was able to accumulate net foreign assets, while containing the rate of inflation.
He noted that domestic liquidity contracted due to monetary sterilisation policies, instituted by the Central Bank.
Evidence of the policies was obvious form increased productivity, reduction of the intermediation spread and interest on credit. Intermediation spread is the difference between the lending and borrowing rates.
Mr. Forte stated that if the appropriate monetary policies were not adapted, inflation rate would have been much higher.
TOP

Housing in Guyana
- progress continues

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

Housing is one of the basic necessities of life and Government, through the Ministry of Housing and Water, has over the last decade spared no effort in assisting Guyanese to acquire their own homes.
Government, through the Ministry of Housing, put mechanisms in place for the advancement in the housing sector, and to date, the Ministry has distributed over 55,000 house lots across Guyana in both the middle and low-income groups.
Based on estimates in 1992, 28,790 houses or an average of 5,758 new housing units were needed each years for the first five year, and by the end of 1996, some 12,000 house lots were distributed.
The enormity of problems in the housing sector demanded massive divestment of land, which had to be accessed from Guysuco and other agencies.
Land had to be accessed from these bodies, which sometimes proved difficult. But once permission was given, plans were set in motion for the development of housing schemes countrywide. Once the land was identified it was cleared and prepared for house lots. But identifying and clearing the land does not mean that all is ready for houses to be built.
Infrastructural works had to be effected, including the construction of streets, digging of drains, building of bridges and culverts and the laying of water mains. Following these works, lots are marked out and allocated.
The Ministry of Housing and Water has since 1993 established 92 housing schemes across Guyana. While this does not fully satisfy housing needs, it has helped tremendously in minimizing the demand for housing.
Recognizing that most people cannot afford to spend exorbitant sums on housing, the Government, by way of a line of credit from the Venezuelan Investment Fund, was able to acquire hundreds of pre-fabricated houses. The first 100 of these were completed at Section 'C' Enterprise West, East Coast Demerara.
Prefabricated houses were also constructed at Bath Settlement, West Coast Berbice, and have been sold to Guyanese.
Also, with the help of former President Jimmy Carter, Government was able to acquire the services of Habitat for Humanity in providing low-income houses.
This international organization has a self-help tradition and provides interest-free loans, mobilizing groups in several parts of the country.
To further help people build their own houses, the Ministry of Housing and Water moved to hand out land titles as soon as possible. Titles were given to the people in order for them to gain easy access to loans and to conduct other financial transactions.
The titles could also be useful in negotiating other loans or hire purchase.
In an effort to provide additional assistance, the Ministry of Housing and Water has reduced the processing fee for land titles from $12,000 to $8,000. And instead of paying the entire amount at once as was previously required, persons can now pay $4,000 to start processing the title, while they have another three months to pay the remaining $4,000.
Land titles are also very important, especially to low income earners. In this regard, the Government is committed to doing all it can to provide sums of money for mortgage financing for low-income earners. New legislation was also enacted to allow the use of the instrument of charge on titles/transports, or collateral for mortgages and to bring other financial institutions into the housing market.
People are therefore urged to take advantage of the facilities offered in the accessing of loans.
Private developers are also facing the housing challenge and between 1993 and 2000, fifty housing schemes were established by private individuals and companies.
Private sector participation is growing in proportion, and currently private sector developers involvement surrounds the revolving low-income housing fund for the construction of hundreds of housing units through public/private partnership; construction and sale of houses by private developers on lots allocated by the Government in various housing schemes; the granting of blocks of land to private developers for the development of housing estates and for sale of the houses in an open and competitive manner.
Additionally, community participation in the development of the housing needs is an area worth noting. This is another important pillar of the housing drive and is geared to providing the opportunities for allottees to build affordable homes at the lowest initial construction cost through their own labour input, and technical and organizational facilitation by the Ministry of Housing.
Added to this, in order to democratize access to shelter, an incremental approach to infrastructure and housing is encouraged.
In order to further facilitate this, Government, through the Central Housing and Planning Authority (CH&PA), in collaboration with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), has also formulated a squatter settlements and depressed areas upgrading project.
This is meant to strengthen the CH&PA in the area of community development and to ensure that depressed areas are integrated into the overall physical and social fabric.
It is intended that this programme will manifest itself in all schemes under construction.
TOP

‘I am never satisfied with any level of crime’
– President urges Opposition support for tougher legislation

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

“Crime is always a problem for me because ideally I would like to see us a s a crime-free society. No President can be satisfied with any crime but then there is a reality too a reality that we have to face that no country is crime-free. We had seen a lull I had spoken on several occasions about the need not to be complacent.”
This is according to President Bharrat Jagdeo, while commenting on the crime situation in Guyana at his media briefing last Friday.
The Head of State noted that that while the crime spree has been drastically reduced, Guyanese, especially the security forces, cannot afford to be any less vigilant.
“I have said this to the police. We just cannot take a break after we think we have made some progress on the crime situation. We constantly have to keep our guard up because people (criminals) are constantly reorganizing an there are lots of criminal enterprises. We have seasonal crime now for Christmas,” he said.
According to the Head of State, before leaving for Nigeria earlier this month, he instructed the Minister of Home Affairs Ronald Gajraj and Commissioner of Police (ag) Floyd McDonald to enhance security measures around Georgetown, to avoid crime, especially pick pocketing which is prominent around the shopping season.
Commenting on the emergence of gang wars in Guyana, the President said he is not satisfied with this development and it does not bode well for the image of any country.
Although they may be killing the bad guys on both sides, it is not good for the image of any country but it is very difficult to stop once this vendetta type of killing starts,” he said.
When asked if he thought the rising incidence of crime is politically motivated, the head of State said, “I do not want to at this stage jump to any conclusion.”
The President also cautioned Guyanese against situations such as the ‘hoax kidnapping’ disclosed recently. However, the Head of State is positive that with greater vigilance, the Guyanese society can be better protected against this scourge.
“I am never satisfied with any crime. I have been urging the security forces to be much more vigilant,” he said, adding that he has been keeping a close tab on the situation and is trying his best, through the security forces, to combat crime.
“There may be room for improvement and I know that in some cases that the Police do not act as expeditiously as they should and it leaves much to be desired. But on the other hand they have a very tough situation too, and even if they were a million times more efficient there would still be crime,” he said.
He hastened to add that he is not in any way condoning errors and efficiencies of the Guyana Police Force, but on a comparative basis, the United Kingdom, in about every 55 minutes, has a serious gun crime. The UK is a country with a per capita income 20 times that of Guyana and a much more well-equipped, trained and organized Police Force, the President pointed out, adding that “the existence of a well trained and better organized Police Force and a high per capita income does not stop crime.”
He noted that while this is reality, countries should not give up hope of combating the scourge.
“That is why we are putting more resources into the Police Force. We are trying to recruit more Policemen and we have to strengthen community policing groups,” he said.
The Head of State noted that this was also pointed out in the Report of Human Rights activist and former People’s National Congress Reform Member on the Disciplined Forces Commission Ms. Maggie Bierne, in her report submitted prior to her resignation.
“I think everyone agrees that we would have to strengthen community policing so that more people get involved in protecting their communities and be better trained,” he said.
The President said he is soliciting the Opposition’s support in Parliament for tougher anti-crime legislation. This he said is currently a matter for debate in Trinidad and Tobago, another Caribbean country experiencing a high crime wave, especially kidnapping.
In expressing his views on the performance of the Police Force, the President noted that “the Police have made significant progress in some areas. We are basically one of the few countries that reversed the trend in the year we have had the upsurge. There was an escalation and then a reversal and no one can tell me that it is as bad as a year ago,” the President said.
He noted that “there has definitely, compared to that period, been a slow down, but I am still not satisfied. I have said we cannot be complacent. We can never ever be complacent about crime because it can rear its head again. We have made progress but we seem to be seeing some disturbing tendencies again, and we have to nip them in the bud. I hope the Police would do that. As President, they have my full support. I can give moral and material support, but the actual going out and dealing with crime, the Police have to do.
He also pointed out that the statistics for other States within the Caribbean, including Jamaica, would support Guyana’s success, as they have had a sustained period of high incidents of crime. Even though Jamaica’s population’s bigger than Guyana’s based on its per capita equivalence there is a crime problem.
The President also expressed sympathy to the families of victims of crime.
Consoling these persons, the Head of State said it is the hardest thing to do as President. He noted that no assistance Government gives could compensate for the loss. He pointed out that Government makes available $1M to the families of Police Officers killed while on duty, but this is far from sufficient.
TOP

Guyana continues to receive international support in the agriculture sector

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

During this year Guyana continued to receive technical assistance from international agencies, which have aided in the continued progress of the agriculture sector.
In January 2003, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between the National Agricultural Research Institute (NARI) and the Indian Council for Agricultural Research (ICAR) for collaboration research in agriculture to promote the agriculture sector. The MoU catered for collaboration in the crop and dairy sectors while technical assistance is targeted for 2004.
Meanwhile, additional support from the Indian Government continued through the Indian Technical Economic Co-operation (ITEC) Assistance. Through this aid, another ITEC expert, Dr. R.S Kharb was sent to NARI in June 2003, to assist in manpower development in seed technology, especially in vegetable seed production and its quality testing; germplasm evaluation and its utilization in the crop improvement programme; evaluation of primary techniques for the availability of disease-free propagation material and the development of a systematic seed production programme.
Dr, Kharb joined Dr. V.C Mathur who is currently a Crop Planner at NARI under the same programme. Dr. Mathur is involved in research on the domestic and export market potential of fruits and vegetables in Guyana and is examining production cycles, reviewing demand and supply cycles, and fruits and vegetables export possibilities for Guyana.
With technical assistance provided by the Malaysian Government, an expert in rambutan cultivation visited NARI in July-August 2003. The technical advice and material provided by the expert have resulted in an effective method of rambutan propagation. This will result in an increase in acreage in rambutan cultivation in the next two to three years.
Exchange notes were signed by the Ministry of Foreign Trade and International Co-operation and the Chinese Ambassador to Guyana in October 2003 for mushroom cultivation. This will allow for a feasibility study and the training of local farmers by experts. This project will commence in 2004.
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Sophia residents comment on a Police Station in their community

Georgetown, GINA, Monday, December 15, 2003

Over the last year, calls for the establishment of a Police Outpost at Sophia had intensified, because of an increase in criminal activity in the area. Last week, Minister of Home Affairs, Ronald Gajraj had announced that Sophia has long outgrown a requirement for a Police Outpost, stating that a Police station would be more effective for the Police to carry out their mandate of service and protection in the area.
Two sites were visited by the Home Affairs Minister, Minister of Housing and Water, Shaik Baksh, who is providing land for the project, and senior officers of the Guyana Police Force, including acting Commissioner, Floyd McDonald and Crime Chief, Leon Trim.
Minister Gajraj announced that a high-level team would examine the two sites and an announcement will be made soon, on which of the locations the station would be built.
He also announced that the prospects of the construction of an additional outpost in the community should not be ruled out.
Today, there is great optimism in the community, as efforts to bolster security at Sophia have intensified. Some residents of the area spoke with GINA.


Leslie Fredericks

"I think it is a very good idea, for the very simple reason that a lot of bandits frequently visit the area. According to the field placing, what they should do is put in about three outposts in separate fields and construct a main Police station so that we will feel more secure in the area because the fields are very long. One each at the front the centre and the back would be better able to help out the situation. We are badly in need of a Station at Sophia. Look how far is the outpost, Prashad Nagar. If something happens in here and you go to that outpost, the bandits already gone".


Albert Standford Jeffrey

"I am an ex-police. I am looking forward for the Government to do this. A lot of things are going on in the country today and there is real need for a Police station in Sophia and I hope that they can do it very quickly but take their time to avoid unnecessary things so that we the residents of Sophia could enjoy a beautiful country":


Amanda Hackshire

"I am happy that they will establish a Police Station in Sophia, because a lot of crime happen in Sophia here and we need that attention from the Government. So its right that they should establish that station in Sophia. I am happy and excited because a police station should have been established a very long time ago. It is not easy to go out there when something is happening in here. We need Police attention right away in here".


Joy Hussien

"It is good with the crime rate there is, but nothing never really bothered me personally. It will be alright according to the rate of what is going on in Sophia. People have their business and they will need their security and privacy. I am a businesswoman and according to what is going on many people in the area are getting rob and it is long overdue. It is difficult to build our life and not know what is going on about your own security. They have to try and do it as early as possible".


Carlotta Cozier

"Well I think it is a good idea yes. Because we have got so many things happening around here there really is need for a Police station. Really in need of it. Because it am usually around here selling and you can see a lot of things happening and I would say if the Police only come up. All in all it is a good idea. I think a station rather than an outpost would do. However the station should always have on-duty Policemen and women, should anything happen, you can easily run into the station and get assistance. Presently there are steady patrols but they don't come up when things are happening".


David Williams

"The establishment of a Police station at Sophia can benefit the community in many different ways. If a Police station is set up at Sophia, electricity is supposed to be in the area. It would be negative to set up a Police station without electricity, so this would be a good move. Obviously it would benefit the community from a security standpoint. There is a lot of crime happening in the Sophia area so the people here will benefit much more".

With this kind of optimism, and the efforts by the Ministry of Home Affairs intensified, Government is hoping that the new aspects of a policing dispensation employed by the Guyana Police Force would be evident at Sophia. That dispensation for the greater part includes an improved relationship and camaraderie among the Force and communities.
There are plans for a Fire Station and a Post Office to be constructed in the compound with the Police station.
TOP

Christmas cheer for the underprivileged

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

The Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security is in the process of finalizing plans for a Christmas party for street children next week.
There are a number of children who would not afforded the joys of Christmas with family and friends, as most of their peers would. The Ministry is hoping to fill this void.
There are a number of other organisations and individuals who are making similar services to children across the country.
The Ministry therefore, takes this opportunity to bring some good cheer to these children living under difficult circumstances.
There will also be a Christmas party for children who receive assistance through the Difficult Circumstances Fund and other children who receive support from the Ministry in various forms.
TOP

Deadline for Calypso submissions set for early January

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

The motion is set for Mash 2004 as the Mash Management Committee gets in to gear for the 2004 Mash celebrations.
Early next year Calypsonians will be required to submit their musical scores for the 2004 Calypso Competition.
Rehearsals will begin on January 5. According to the coordinator of the Calypso competition calypsonians will not be allowed to change their scripts during performances in next year's competition.
Reports are that while the competition is in progress, performers feel inclined to change words in their scripts to get the attention of the judges or audience.
The calypso competition has always been a major highlight of the annual Mash celebration. This year there will be no difference. In 2003, approximately 15 calypsonians registered for the event. There is the possibility that more will enter the competition next year.
The quarterfinals for this competition will be on February 7 at Essequibo while the semi-finals will be held on February 14 at the Sophia Exhibition Complex.
The Ministry of Culture, has been working on decentralizing Mash activities for the past five years and this year will be no different.
Next year the Calypso Finals will be held in Bartica. Last year it was held in Anna Regina, Essequibo.
Events to get the ball rolling for the 2004 celebration will begin on January 11 with a Private Sector Brunch followed by Mash Jamboree on January 24 at Uitvlugt Community Centre Ground.
The Mash Jamboree was restarted last year as an event geared on setting the pace for Mash activities which are generally for two months.
The Mash theme for Mash 2004 is 'Unity, beauty and more in 2004'
TOP

The education sector critical to gender mainstreaming

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

The National Commission on Women and the Women's Affairs Bureau are pioneers of the policy of gender equity in Guyana.
Approximately two months ago the Caricom Secretariat through, Andaiye, produced a document which relates to gender mainstreaming in Guyana and the critical areas through which it will have to be implemented.
The Education sector is seen as one critical area through which this will have to be addressed.
The recent "Plan of Action to 2005: Framework for mainstreaming gender into key Caricom programmes" outlined the need for policy formulation on the factors related to gender differentials in participation and performance from primary to tertiary levels of education.
Other important options were the impact on early childhood development on gender and eliminating gender stereotyping in educational materials.
Other options to mainstream gender into the education system would be to implement a teacher education programme on the impact on gender education and parenting programmes to address gender socialisation and sexuality from an early age.
It also pointed to the need for programmes to attract more males to the teaching profession and for gender training to be a mandatory component of teacher education.
The Commission and Bureau through their Research and Documentation Unit is promoting research and other work on gender mainstreaming. Through their documentation centre, they contribute to research on the issue of gender.
TOP

Training and security play a vital role in the Prisons environment

Georgetown, GINA, December 15, 2003

Training, staffing capacity, recruitment and security measures were some aspects that were highlighted today at the Disciplined Forces Commission (DFC) hearing.
Director of Prisons Dale Erskine made his presentation to Chairman of the Commission Ian Chang, Brigadier (ret) David Granger and Anil Nandallal.

STAFFING CAPACITY

Mr. Erskine said that in the four-year strategic plan the Prison Service is hoping to increase the staffing capacity to 506 for all the prison locations. There are the Camp Street Prison, Mazaruni, Timehri, Lusignan and New Amsterdam.
He noted at the moment there are now 360 prison officers but admitted there should be a staffing capacity of 452.

RECRUITMENT

At the moment there are 196 assistant prison officers (APO) and according to the Director of Prisons, without the formation of the Public Service Commission no one can be promoted.
When asked by Chairman Chang if an APO is the lowest ranking prison officer, Erskine answered in the affirmative.
The Director said that it takes the APO two years before he can be appointed to a Prison Officer. He also noted that if a cadet possesses the qualification and is recommended that cadet will be offered an officer's course, which takes one year.
Three Caribbean Council Examination (C.X.C) or three General (GCE) is the minimum requirement to apply for the APO position.

PROMOTION

When an officer is recommended for a promotion by the Officer-in-Charge of any of the prison location, he sends a copy to the Ministry of Home Affairs who in turn would send the recommendation to the Public Service Ministry.

ETHNIC COMPOSITION

DFC lawyer Bertlyn Reynolds asked about the ethnic composition of the Prison Service. Erskine said that mostly Afro-Guyanese are working at the five prisons locations. In relation to East Indian the percentage is five, while the mixed race is four percent.
He noted that this in no way reflects the ethnic policy of the Service, since anyone can apply. However, the Director of Prisons observed that all are welcomed to joined the Service.
The percentage of female prison officers are 38 percent, with their jobs being clerical and the Director of Prisons said that in the strategic plan he wants the ratio to be 70:30 females to males. At the moment females are not being recruited.

TRAINING

Mr. Erskine believes that joint training with the Guyana Police Force (GPF) is very important for Prisons officers. He pointed out that with such training, the officers are exposed to intelligence gathering. The relationship between the GPF and the Prison Service is excellent since the Service was a part of the Force, Erskine added.
There is also a one-year training course for Prison Officers with the Police which Erskine said is a great foundation for trainees.
The last training course for senior training staff was in 1985. Commissioner Granger asked if there were any professional grading and training. And the Director of Prisons said that the Service has access to information from the American Correctional Association (ACA).
He also noted that on his recent visit to Canada he received a training curriculum, in which valuable information was obtained and the Service is looking into some aspects of the curriculum.
However, it was recommended that persons with experience come to Guyana and local Prison Officers share their knowledge with the officers.

SECURITY

Since the February 23 jailbreak, security has been strengthened and at the moment a tower is being constructed at D'Urban Street to monitor the activities in the vicinity. According to Erskine with all the bars that are located along the street, it is accessible for persons to throw illegal items in the Prisons compound.
He noted that since the break-out, 95 percent of what the Police Complaints Authority recommended have been implemented, and he observed that it has been done at a satisfactory level.
A number of weaponry were purchased this year and in next year's Budget, surveillance cameras will be purchased for Lusginan and New Amsterdam Prisons.
To reduce illegal items in the Prisons, the Prison officers are checked randomly.
"The Prisons Administration is taking steps to improve security in the Prisons countrywide," said Erskine.
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